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 Football Myths No.6
Topic Originator: sammer  
Date:   Fri 21 Jun 23:39

‘Football is a faster game nowadays and the players from the past would struggle to cope.’

I offer the following clip from an FA Cup Replay in 1974 between Liverpool and Leicester. It lasts just over 20 minutes but the first 10 minutes are probably enough to make my point.

Cup semis were not typical- the football could be frenetic as this one is- but even allowing for the fact we are seeing highlights, it is clear the pace of the game is actually higher than what we mostly see now. Passing is important, but not to the modern extent of dominating possession, so much of the time both teams are trying to force errors from the opposition. As a result play changes ends much more rapidly than it does today.

Tackling is brutal by modern standards, but on the evidence of this clip is hard and fair. Without the fear of picking up yellow cards players can commit themselves fully to the challenge. No player ever seems to stay down when tackled, allowing these short ‘breathers’ the modern players are so keen to take. No diving either. Only one substitute allowed in any case.

My conclusion: the modern game is smoother and more pleasing on the eye, more technical, and the players have to think tactically more than in the past. Passing is more controlled today and players show more patience when in attacking areas. But just listen to the crowd and tell me we have not lost some of the guts of our game. Nowadays the ball is pinged around quickly but the game may actually be slower today than it once was.

https://youtu.be/Pkath6jGtJo
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 Re: Football Myths No.6
Topic Originator: widtink  
Date:   Fri 21 Jun 23:51

https://youtu.be/Pkath6jGtJo



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 Re: Football Myths No.6
Topic Originator: parathletic  
Date:   Sat 22 Jun 00:24

I think the pace of play may have been equal to that of now the difference is the players themselves will be quicker nowadays. That's just the natural progression of the human body. For example Alan Wells won the 1980 Olympics in 10.25 seconds and he was travelling yet nowadays you wouldn't even qualify for the Olympics with that.
I'm not saying there weren't quick players then but they had to contend with heavier footwear, often heavier pitches and there have been advances on the sports science side of things now. That's what makes it hard to compare the two.I'm an 80's child but the ability to beat a man with trickery seems to have diminished? Players seem to get more protection now-I must admit I enjoy watching games where the tackles are hard but fair.The amount of stoppages now possibly contributes to the slower pace of play.The pitches now must help to make it more technical compared to some of the pitches they used to play on.



Post Edited (Sat 22 Jun 00:45)
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 Re: Football Myths No.6
Topic Originator: veteraneastender  
Date:   Sat 22 Jun 00:33

Sammer - you'll mind when the Pars played something like 7 competitive games in 17 days during season 1964-65, finishing with a league game on the Saturday, a Scottish Cup replay on the Monday and a Fairs Cup tie on the Wednesday.

Nowadays clubs moan if they have a midweek European game with a Saturday domestic fixture over a normal run of games.



Post Edited (Sat 22 Jun 00:34)
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