DAFC.net
Home 14 October 2019 
 Post Message  |  Top of Board  |  Go to Topic  |  Search  |  Twitter Updates  |  Log In   Forum Rules  |  Newer Topic  |  Older Topic  |  end 
[ please login to use the Like feature ]
 Thanks to cricket
Topic Originator: OzPar  
Date:   Wed 9 Oct 03:38

It is fascinating to note that we owe the existence of Dunfermline Athletic FC to the sport of cricket. For it was a decision by members of the Dunfermline Cricket Club to form a football offshoot in 1874 to keep players fit during the winter that set the wheels in motion. Initially known as the Dunfermline Club, it changed its name to Dunfermline Athletic FC in 1885.

I remember from my days living in Perth being told that St Johnstone too can source its creation to the local cricket club for the very same reason. So in Victorian times, cricket was clearly an established sport in Scotland.

Isn't it odd that while cricket was quite popular in the late 1800s in Scotland, it so quickly lost its pre-eminence to football? Why did it virtually die out in Scotland? Was it because cricket was seen as an elitist sport? Something that only the well-off could participate in, requiring quite an expensive kit as opposed to just a leather football?

Interestingly, rugby union in Dunfermline didn't become established until the 1890s, so football had the run on that in West Fife too.

Anybody got any thoughts on this?



Post Edited (Wed 09 Oct 03:39)
[IP address logged]
Report Abuse   Reply To This Message
 Re: Thanks to cricket
Topic Originator: neils  
Date:   Wed 9 Oct 10:10

It was started by these clubs to give the players something to do in the winter?

Not sure that cricket is elitist, but in the early days all sport was, football included.

Queens Park and the earlier clubs were strictly amateur, but larger crowds started to watch, teams such as Renton, Vale of Leven, Dumbarton took off, it simply became a juggernaut once it hit the industrial areas.

Cricket is fairly big in Fife, but the climate, and the time it takes to play makes it difficult.

Baseball was big in the Midlands also!
[IP address logged]
Report Abuse   Reply To This Message
 Re: Thanks to cricket
Topic Originator: Sliema Par  
Date:   Wed 9 Oct 10:13

17,000 participate in Cricket in Scotland and the number has doubled in 3 years.

It may have been encouraged by Scotland beating England in Edinburgh on 10th June 2018 giving me a birthday to remember!

What Scotland really needs is to play in the County Championship as a " County" as that would promote the Sport considerably.Wales has one team competing.

It has become more difficult for Scotland to be in the World Cup as the numbers were ,inexplicably ,reduced.
[IP address logged]
Report Abuse   Reply To This Message
 Re: Thanks to cricket
Topic Originator: neils  
Date:   Wed 9 Oct 12:16

Plenty teams in fife, it's just not at the level, and probably never will be of other countries such as England-even county leagues which are a high level.

Still a great game to watch, I think we are at the level of the Netherlands-a decent niche sport enjoyed by the players.
[IP address logged]
Report Abuse   Reply To This Message
 Re: Thanks to cricket
Topic Originator: Socks  
Date:   Wed 9 Oct 12:34

The original Dunfermline FC did not change its name in 1885, as is stated above. DAFC was a breakaway club and both clubs existed together for a period. Gien that the breakaway was due to football players wanting to play football only without having to bother about cricket, it's not surprising that DAFC became the stronger of the two.

I don't think cricket ever did come close to dying out in Scotland. Cricket, like athletics, generally remained as a participation sport while football and (to a lesser extent) rugby started to draw crowds. I remember reading 20 years ago or so that more people played cricket in Scotland than played rugby - I don't know what the ratio is now, but wouldn't be surprised if that's still the case.
[IP address logged]
Report Abuse   Reply To This Message
 Re: Thanks to cricket
Topic Originator: parsfan  
Date:   Wed 9 Oct 14:06

Socks beat me to it.

The two clubs coexisted for a few years and we drew them in The Scottish Cup a couple of times with them refusing to play.

I think Hibs have a record, or at least high, score against them and they generally think that's us (I've seen it in their programmes).

I've often wondered who I would have supported if they'd still existed in the 70s.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The universe is ruled by chance and indifference
[IP address logged]
Report Abuse   Reply To This Message
 Re: Thanks to cricket
Topic Originator: sammer  
Date:   Wed 9 Oct 16:23

Hearts player Donald Ford and also Andy Goram were considered to be pretty good cricketers, although Goram of course was brought up in England.

Carlisle United's Chris Balderstone was a good midfielder but better known for playing a couple of test matches, where unfortunately he was twice yorked for a duck by Michael Holding. Geoff Hurst, when he was struggling as a midfielder with West Ham, seriously considered giving up football and concentrating on cricket where he thought he had a better chance of success.
[IP address logged]
Report Abuse   Reply To This Message
 Re: Thanks to cricket
Topic Originator: parathletic  
Date:   Wed 9 Oct 21:20

Phil Neville captained England Schoolboys at cricket and apparently broke lots of batting records
[IP address logged]
Report Abuse   Reply To This Message
 Re: Thanks to cricket
Topic Originator: OzPar  
Date:   Wed 9 Oct 21:36

You are correct, Socks. It was a breakaway. But it doesn't change the fact that DAFC owes its existence to cricket.

I don't for a minute believe that cricket is more popular than rugby in Scotland. If indeed there are 17,000 cricketers, surely there has to be two or three times that number participating in rugby?

I much prefer watching cricket to rugby, but that is no thanks to Scottish schooling in the 1960s/early 70s where, in my experience, we were rarely given the opportunity to play cricket. We participated in orienteering more often.

:)
[IP address logged]
Report Abuse   Reply To This Message
 Re: Thanks to cricket
Topic Originator: The Roy Barry Fan Club  
Date:   Wed 9 Oct 23:45

There is a kid's history of Dunfermline Athletic in the style of 'Horrible Histories' written in 2015 for the Heritage Trust.

This is available here:
https://daht.org.uk/story.php?t=The_Truly_Horrific_History_of_DAFC&ID=2042

When we were looking at the cause of the break away from Dunfermline Cricket Club, where football had formed a winter sub-section from 1874, it seemed to us that it was in part due to an argument over money -- or at least subscriptions. Plus Ca Change.

Certainly cricket was very popular in Dunfermline -- and far from a middle class game. My Dad played cricket for Dunfermline High School in 1937/38 and 38/39 seasons, but my grandfather, as an injured coal miner, was too poor to afford the rugby subscriptions for him to play rugby as well. They were certainly playing cricket as boys in Halbeath -- my Dad once put a cricket ball through the window of the Miner's Institute (later Amanda's Hideaway) and on to a snooker table.

Dennis Compton stands out in my mind as some-one who played both Test Cricket for England and also football for Arsenal just after WWII (when they won both the league and a couple of years later the FA Cup.



Post Edited (Thu 10 Oct 07:35)
[IP address logged]
Report Abuse   Reply To This Message
 Re: Thanks to cricket
Topic Originator: wee eck  
Date:   Thu 10 Oct 08:52

Denis Compton's brother, Leslie, was another accomplished footballer/cricketer. Like his brother he played for Arsenal and Middlesex. He was capped at football but not cricket.
[IP address logged]
Report Abuse   Reply To This Message
 Re: Thanks to cricket
Topic Originator: McCaig`s Tower  
Date:   Thu 10 Oct 14:02

I think there are quite a few football clubs that started life as cricket clubs – Stoke and Sheffield Wednesday for example – and AC Milan played both sports initially, I believe.

I guess cricket had more of a history as being organised and codified. I hadn’t appreciated the extent to which Rugby and Football co-existed before being “organised”. There appeared to be several variants of rules, with the big schism being the extent to which you could use your hands. Eventually one form coalesced under the Rugby school rules, and another around the Association variant.

As for dual internationalists, Scot Symon played both cricket and football (soccer) internationally. He also took over as manager of East Fife and guided them to a Division B title, two third places and two fourth places in the top division, a Scottish Cup final (and two League Cups, the less said about one the better). That’s quite a record. He was also manager of Rangers when they lost at Berwick, and was sacked when top of the league.
[IP address logged]
Report Abuse   Reply To This Message
 Top of Board  |  Forum List  |  Threaded View   Forum Rules  |  Newer Topic  |  Older Topic  |  end 


 Forum List  |  Need a Login? Register Here 
 User Login
 User Name:
 Password:
 Remember my login:
   
 Forgot Your Password?
Enter your email address or user name below and a new password will be sent to the email address associated with your profile.
Security : type 'pars' in the box:
email: