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 The Wee Barra
Topic Originator: GG Riva  
Date:   Mon 20 Dec 14:59

I`ve just finished reading a wonderful biography about the former Celtic, Everton, Leeeds and Scotland international. Towards the end of his career, he played a couple of seasons (1968-69 and 1969-70) in a decent Morton team. He almost certainly played at EEP but I can`t remember him. One game was an eventful 5-3 win for the Pars. I think Roy Barry was sent off after about 10 mins, for questioning the linesman`s eyesight. 😃



Not your average Sunday League player.
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 Re: The Wee Barra
Topic Originator: wee eck  
Date:   Mon 20 Dec 15:24

Is this a Christmas quiz? I believe that was the nickname of Bobby Collins.

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 Re: The Wee Barra
Topic Originator: sammer  
Date:   Mon 20 Dec 15:33

I remember Collins playing for Morton at EEP but it appears that was the season after our bizarre 5-3 victory. He was playing sweeper and, not surprisingly given he was only 5’3, was losing most of his aerial challenges. He must have been aged 38 at least by then.

Collins was clearly an outstanding midfield player whose scoring record for Scotland was more than impressive. His skill, experience and win at all costs mentality was a big influence as Leeds United emerged as a force in the English game. Billy Bremner, Johnny Giles and Norman Hunter were groomed in the darker arts, and you could add Pat Crerand and Bertie Auld to that list as well as his last discovery- Joe Jordan at Morton.

Yet considering he played for Celtic, Everton and Leeds Collins didn’t win many medals in a long career. Maybe Bobby Collins spent too much time trying to impose himself on opponents and forgot to use his ability to outplay the opposition.

sammer
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 Re: The Wee Barra
Topic Originator: GG Riva  
Date:   Mon 20 Dec 15:43

Quote:

wee eck, Mon 20 Dec 15:24

Is this a Christmas quiz? I believe that was the nickname of Bobby Collins.


Sorry, Eck. I meant to include his name after his nickname.....



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 Re: The Wee Barra
Topic Originator: Buspasspar  
Date:   Mon 20 Dec 16:21

Cheers for that G.G. will add it to Santa`s list

We are forever shaped by the Children we once were
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 Re: The Wee Barra
Topic Originator: GG Riva  
Date:   Mon 20 Dec 16:58

Quote:

Buspasspar, Mon 20 Dec 16:21

Cheers for that G.G. will add it to Santa`s list


I`m sure you`ll enjoy it, young fella. Lots of evocative black and white photos.... You could maybe flick through them while listening to Dvorak`s Symphony No 9 - famously used in the Hovis commercial and Tony Capstick`s "Capstick Comes Home" Christmas chart hit.

Sammer, Bobby Collins freely admitted that if anybody kicked him, he would return the compliment at the first opportunity. You, better than anyone, will remember that skillful footballers were afforded scant protection by referee`s because it was considered "a man`s game." He was by no means alone in his "eye for an eye" philosophy. My previous book was Denis Law`s autobiography. He could look after himself, too.

Leeds were a talented, uncompromising team, but Collins maintains that it was their opponents who started the rough tactics, more often than not. Maybe they were hoping to get their retaliation in first?



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 Re: The Wee Barra
Topic Originator: sammer  
Date:   Mon 20 Dec 17:32

Leeds were involved in too many dirty games for them to be the victims. Their promotion decider against Sunderland in 1964 set new standards of professional fouling. Collins deliberate late shoulder charge on a Liverpool defender in the 1965 FA Cup Final dislocated a collar bone. A match against Everton saw the referee take the players off the pitch for 10 minutes to cool things down; Collins I think had a grudge against Everton who had been prepared to sell him to Leeds. Some of their European ties were more battles than contests which led to Collins having his thigh bone broken against Torino.

I take your point about fighting fire with fire, as the likes of Denis Law did. But there was a systematic element to Leeds fouling that went beyond what was reasonable. I used to play indoor football with the son of Jim Storie who`d played for Leeds in the early 1960s and his father was told to make sure he clattered the opposition goalkeeper when the first cross came in. Yet for all their win at all costs mentality, one that Collins implanted at Elland Road, Leeds actually won less than they should have done given the quality of football they could play. Everton won the League after they sold Collins, and Leeds won the League after he was injured out of top level football.

sammer
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 Re: The Wee Barra
Topic Originator: GG Riva  
Date:   Mon 20 Dec 17:50

Quote:

sammer, Mon 20 Dec 17:32

Leeds were involved in too many dirty games for them to be the victims. Their promotion decider against Sunderland in 1964 set new standards of professional fouling. Collins deliberate late shoulder charge on a Liverpool defender in the 1965 FA Cup Final dislocated a collar bone. A match against Everton saw the referee take the players off the pitch for 10 minutes to cool things down; Collins I think had a grudge against Everton who had been prepared to sell him to Leeds. Some of their European ties were more battles than contests which led to Collins having his thigh bone broken against Torino.

I take your point about fighting fire with fire, as the likes of Denis Law did. But there was a systematic element to Leeds fouling that went beyond what was reasonable. I used to play indoor football with the son of Jim Storie who`d played for Leeds in the early 1960s and his father was told to make sure he clattered the opposition goalkeeper when the first cross came in. Yet for all their win at all costs mentality, one that Collins implanted at Elland Road, Leeds actually won less than they should have done given the quality of football they could play. Everton won the League after they sold Collins, and Leeds won the League after he was injured out of top level football.


I`m not for a minute trying to paint Revie`s Leeds team as victims. They had some great players, but almost all of them could mix it with the worst and had a downright nasty streak. Collins was undoubtedly a tough little man and a huge influence, along with Giles, Hunter, Bremner, Jackie Charlton et al, but for me it was mainly down to the manager. If he didn`t like the cynical football on show, he`d have weeded these players out. I don`t think it`s too fanciful to suggest that Leeds` opponents would know they were in for a hard 90 mins and would adjust their tactics accordingly......



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 Re: The Wee Barra
Topic Originator: 68guns  
Date:   Mon 20 Dec 18:15

Can`t agree with sammer as I`m a big Leeds fan.
Leeds didn`t have a promotion decider against Sunderland in 1963-64 season, their games took place on Boxing Day and 2 days later. The game on the 28th was lost by Leeds who would only lose one further game in the league to PNE in March. They then went on to win 8 and draw 2 of their last 10 games.
Collins was targeted by Revie in 1962 as a 31 year old as the man to show and protect his talented young squad.
They won the second division championship in his second full season and the following season he played 48 times scoring 10 goals as Leeds lost out on the league title by goal average to Manchester United and the FA cup final to Liverpool.
He was rewarded with the footballer of the year award for 1965 and a scotland recall at the age of 34.
Leeds unites first European appearance was against Torino and a 2-1 home win was followed by a gutsy 0-0 draw away after Collins suffered broken thigh after 50 minutes, the 10 men hanging and defending stoutly. Jack Charlton quoted as saying they felt they owed it to Bobby.
Leeds went on to lose in the Semi Final of that years Fairs cup to Real Zaragoza after a play off.
Collins fondly remembered down Leeds way and often referred to the Heart and Soul of the team that Revie formed.
Prior to collins arrival Leeds had spent all but 5 years as a second tier club since the war.

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 Re: The Wee Barra
Topic Originator: Buspasspar  
Date:   Tue 21 Dec 09:25

From the Guardian :-

At Leeds, he established a formidable partnership with the manager Don Revie, who signed him for £25,000 in March 1962. Revie later described him as "the best signing I ever made. Leeds can never thank him enough for the transformation he brought to the club." Collins recalled: "Don knew that good pros had good habits and I think that`s what he was hoping to instil when he signed me. One of the great things about the boss was the way he built up a comradeship. We all loved him because he treated us properly and commanded our utmost respect. He also knew how to build a team."

We are forever shaped by the Children we once were
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 Re: The Wee Barra
Topic Originator: The One Who Knocks  
Date:   Tue 21 Dec 09:37

https://youtu.be/dYBj_qAJtRA
Memorable scene from the Damned United


Post Edited (Tue 21 Dec 09:37)
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 Re: The Wee Barra
Topic Originator: LochgellyAlbert  
Date:   Tue 21 Dec 09:43

Quote:

Buspasspar, Tue 21 Dec 09:25

From the Guardian :-

At Leeds, he established a formidable partnership with the manager Don Revie, who signed him for £25,000 in March 1962. Revie later described him as "the best signing I ever made. Leeds can never thank him enough for the transformation he brought to the club." Collins recalled: "Don knew that good pros had good habits and I think that`s what he was hoping to instil when he signed me. One of the great things about the boss was the way he built up a comradeship. We all loved him because he treated us properly and commanded our utmost respect. He also knew how to build a team."


Revie also married a Lochgelly lassie, another decision he never regretted!🤔❤
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